Wayne State University

Aim Higher

APS CUWiP at Wayne State

Students have the option of presenting their research through a poster and/or oral presentation. Poster and oral presentation sessions will take place on the Saturday and Sunday of the conference, respectively. We will send an email containing information and resources relevant to presentations to CUWiP attendees who express interest when they register. If you intend to present a poster or a talk but do not receive this email, please let us know!

Abstracts for both poster and oral presentations are due Friday, December 30, via the Google form in our information email. For either a poster or oral presentation, the abstract should be a maximum of 500 characters.

Slides for oral presentations are due Friday, January 6, via email. You will have ten minutes to present with another few minutes for questions – so practice your talk and make sure it obeys these time constraints!

 

Poster Abstracts

 

Jacqueline Beechert, University of Michigan

Study of a background kaon decay for the KOTO experiment

The KOTO experiment is a high-energy physics experiment based at J-PARC in Tokai-mura, Japan. It aims to measure the branching ratio of the decay of a neutral kaon into a neutral pion, a neutrino, and an antineutrino. Because the Standard Model branching ratio of this signal decay is about 3 x 10^-11, cuts within KOTO’s detectors are necessary to remove background decays. I will detail my efforts to improve KOTO’s existing cuts on the background decay of a neutral kaon into three pions.

 

Valerie Grafton, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Testing an Open Source Laser Rangefinder

A cost effective open source laser rangefinder was tested to determine its accuracy and applications. The distance from an object and maximum range was found with the laser rangefinder using open source Arduino code. A demo was created of the laser rangefinder and its Arduino code printing live and accurate distances to a LCD screen. This laser rangefinder is unique that it uses SETS, open source code, and is incredibly cost effective to buy a kit for thirty-two dollars.

 

Rachel Hunter, Northern Michigan University

Testing for a Sterile Neutrino in Computer Models of the RNPS Short Baseline Nuclear Reactor Experiments

A series of experiments were conducted to find proof of neutrino oscillations. The data was used to produce a plot for the values of the parameters of oscillation. However, the experiments were analyzed incorrectly; there are differences between the theory and experimental data. The goal of this project is to find evidence for or against a fourth type of neutrino by reproducing the plots for data taken at RNPS in order to confirm the original analysis. This is an ongoing project.

 

Elizabeth Lindquist, Hope College

Quantitative Analysis of Metalloproteins Stoichiometry with PIXE and NRA

Metalloproteins comprise a third of all proteins, yet most of them have incomplete stoichiometries. While it is possible to determine which metals are in a protein, it is difficult to determine how many. An ion beam analysis technique comprised of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission and Nuclear Reaction Analysis is being developed to determine this metal-to-protein ratio and is standardized on Cyanocobalamin and Cytochrome C. Current work includes expanding the data set to other metalloproteins.

 

Anna Lunderberg, Hope College

Exploring the Effects of Copper on Composition and Charge Storage of Prussian Blue Analogue Pseudocapacitors

Hexacyanoferrate (HCF) modified nickel film can be used as a pseudocapacitor. This project focuses on the effects of the HCF film after adding copper to the nickel metal film. A NiCu film was deposited onto a gold substrate with a controlled potential electrolysis experiment, then was modified and characterized with a cyclic voltammetry experiment. Preliminary data suggests that the resulting charge storage of the HCF film increases when the pre-modification level of copper is increased

 

Natalie (Pi) Nuessle, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Photorefractive Effects in a Double Doped Strontium Barium Niobate (SBN60;Ce, Rh) Crystal

The equations and behavior of photorefraction (the bending of light due to the previous interaction of light particles in the lattice of a crystal) in single-dopance materials are fairly well described in literature. Over a year and a half, I discovered that these models don`t seem to translate well even into a well-understood material (Strontium barium niobate) if it`s double-doped. So, I began to characterize the crystal`s behavior as fully as possible. This poster summarizes the results.

 

Catharine Shipps, The Ohio State University

Determining the dominant secondary structures of an RNA molecule during cotranscriptional folding dynamics by grouping similar dominant structures

The goal of our project is to statistically determine the dominant secondary structures that arise during the co transcriptional folding of a given RNA sequence and at what time those structures are prevalent. Existing mechanical tools can create plots with this data but it becomes prohibitively expensive to use them for sequences longer than 100bp. Using existing simulations and original programs we seek to improve the efficiency and interpretability of such structure population plots.

 

Kayla Storie, Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology

Micromachining on Flexible Plastic Substrates

This work aims to investigate the feasibility of fabricating flexible electronic devices on polyethylene terephthalate (PET), a common, inexpensive plastic. We tested PET's ability to withstand standard cleanroom processing techniques and its potential to effectively act as a substrate for electronic devices.

 

Michelle Sugimoto, Kalamazoo College

Probing surface conductivity in ultra-thin ALD ZnO films

Infrared spectroscopy has been used to understand the temperature-dependent electronic properties of ZnO films grown by atomic layer deposition (ALD)

 

Saige Rutherford, Wayne State University

Fetal fMRI Methodology: In Utero Exploration of Brain Connectivity

This project seeks to map connections within the brain of the human fetus. We aim to understand the gap between brain development and environmental/biological factors that impact health. We utilize resting-state functional MRI to model brain development. While the recent application of this imaging technique allows investigation of developmental disorder origins, the unique challenges associated with fetal MRI must be overcome. Here, we discuss the methods used in data acquisition.

 

Nicole Witzleben, Wayne State University

Design and Implementation of a Low-Cost Magnetomotive Molecular Ultrasound Imaging System

Ultrasound is one of the most popular imaging systems in clinical settings because it is portable, cost efficient, and captures real-time images. Ultrasound’s lack of contrast and resolution at the molecular level hinders its imaging capabilities. MMUS imaging rectifies these issues. By tagging tissues with magnetic nanoparticles and applying a pulsed magnetic field, we see contrast between the tagged tissue in response to the magnetic field.

 

Anna Wormmeester, Hope College

Spectroscopic Emission from Argon and Nitrogen Microplasmas

Many electronics utilize microgaps, and can produce plasma. The breakdown condition and spectral emission of nitrogen and argon plasmas were examined in a microgap under microwave excitation. The differences of the plasma discharge were studied in three different microgap sizes, using nitrogen and argon. The breakdown condition was defined as the input power that ignites microplasma. A diffraction grating spectrometer was used to test nitrogen and argon by exploring the emission spectra.

 

Talk Abstracts

 

Marina Davis, Ohio State University

The Effects of Gravitational Waves on the Horizon Generators of a Schwarzschild Black Hole

Gravitational waves are fluctuations of spacetime curvature generated in gravitational interactions. We study the effects of gravitational radiation on the event horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole. We predict that gravitational waves cause a permanent deviation in the horizon generators. We first consider the metric perturbation and its propagation through spacetime by which we can then find the deviation in the null generators via the geodesic deviation equation.

 

Tali Khain, University of Michigan

The Orbital Dynamics of New Trans-Neptunian Objects in the Solar System

I will discuss the orbital dynamics of recently discovered Trans-Neptunian Objects, which is relevant to the search for the hypothesized Planet 9.

 

Claire Kopenhafer, Michigan State University

Exploring Galactic Scaling Relations With Numerical Simulations

The global galaxy properties show many correlations with each other. These scaling relations arise from the complex interplay between the galaxy and its surrounding circumgalactic gas, but exactly how these processes result in the observed scaling relations remains uncertain. With the hydrodynamic code Enzo, I am exploring the plausibility of a mechanism proposed to explain these relations. As this project is ongoing, I will discuss my preliminary results and some of the associated challenges.

 

RuthAnn Gregory, Michigan State University

Testing Optical Components for the ATLAS Detector Upgrade

The ATLAS detector is one of the four main experiments in CERN's Large Hadron Collider. ATLAS looks at particle collisions in the Large Hadron Collider to see if any new particles come out of those collisions. New upgrades will allow ATLAS to look at more particle collisions than ever before. I have been testing optical components to be used in these upgrades.

 

Grace Haza, Indiana University

A trigger for di-Higgs events decaying to WWbb in a fully hadronic final state for the ATLAS detector

The ATLAS detector utilizes trigger mechanisms to quickly determine if certain events from proton-proton collisions at the LHC are relevant for analysis. In the hh->WWbb search, there is both boosted and resolved topologies that have different numbers of jets, which makes designing a trigger an interesting problem. We designed a trigger based on requirements of a b-jet, fat jet transverse momentum, and fat jet mass.

 

Ruth Anyaeche, Fisk University

Heteropoly acid Immobilization and Cross-linking in a Polymer Electrolyte Membrane for Fuel Cell

Over the years, better techniques have reduced the amount of nitrous oxide released from cars but these gases are still responsible for around 8% of global warming. Fuel cells have been proven to be a more environmentally friendly substitute to gasoline. Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM), a fuel cell catalyst, can be made more effective with the attachment of a compound called Heteropoly acid (HPA).

 

Elizabeth Lindquist, Hope College

Quantitative Analysis of Metalloproteins Stoichiometry with PIXE and NRA

Metalloproteins comprise a third of all proteins, yet most of them have incomplete stoichiometries. While it is possible to determine which metals are in a protein, it is difficult to determine how many. An ion beam analysis technique comprised of Particle-Induced X-ray Emission and Nuclear Reaction Analysis is being developed to determine this metal-to-protein ratio and is standardized on Cyanocobalamin and Cytochrome C. Current work includes expanding the data set to other metalloproteins.

 

Pi Nuessle, Rose-Hulman Institute

Photorefractive Effects in a Double Doped Strontium Barium Niobate (SBN60;Ce, Rh) Crystal

The behavior of photorefraction (i.e., the bending of light due to the previous interaction of light particles in the lattice of a crystal) in single-dopance materials are fairly well described in literature. Over about a year and a half, I discovered that these models don`t seem to translate well even into a well-understood material (strontium barium niobate) if it`s double-doped. So, I began to characterize the crystal`s behavior as fully as possible.